How to get to Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island)

All water taxis and ferries to the Island leave from Cleveland โ€“ which is an estimated 50 minute drive from the Brisbane CBD, 40 minute drive from the Brisbane Airport and 1 hour 20 minute drive from the Gold Coast. There is parking at the ferry terminal surrounds.

  • Train
    You can travel to Cleveland by bus and train. See Translink for timetables. The Stradbroke Flyer water taxi provides a free shuttle bus from the Cleveland Train Station 10 minutes before water taxi departures (some early and late services excluded). A Transdev bus also travels to the Stradbroke Ferries water taxi from the Cleveland Train Station before water taxi departures (some early and late services excluded).

  • Bus
    Stradbroke Flyer water taxi provides a free shuttle bus from the Cleveland Bus Stop, in Middle Street, 15 minutes before water taxi departures (some early and late services excluded). A Transdev bus also travels to the Stradbroke Ferries water taxi from the Cleveland Bus Stop, in Middle Street, before water taxi departures (some early and late services excluded).

  • Ferry and Water Taxi Timetables
    All Stradbroke Ferries information on barge and water taxi timetables can be found here.
    All Straddie Flyer information on water taxi timetables can be found here.

IMAGE CREDIT – PAUL GIGGLE

Getting to Mulgumpin (Moreton Island)

Travel to Mulgumpin is via the Micat through Moreton Island Adventures. Information on booking a vehicle ferry is accessed here.

Tangalooma Island Resort also offers a passenger ferry service with all timetables and booking information here.

Quandamooka Promise

Our Ancestors have walked on our lands and seas and we look to you to care and respect this country.

Quandamooka People, who are yuluburriba, the people of the sand and sea, call North Stradbroke Island by its Jandai name, Minjerribah. Our connection with Minjerribah dates back since time immemorial and as such Minjerribah is rich in our culture and heritage. Our relationship to Quandamookajara (Quandamooka Country) and yarabinjara (sea country) is strong; based on our laws passed down by our Ancestors.

On your stay on Minjerribah, you may tread the sands on the Eastern Beach. Being sand, these dunes move with time, but the Nughi, Nunukul and Gorenpul had many feasts here. The shells and bones left after these feasts were gathered carefully and placed on top of each other. Over millennia, the piles of carefully placed shells and bones in these tribal eating places became middens. There are middens in the dunes you may pass and on the headlands. The headland now known as Main Beach Headland was used often for feasts and gatherings. It is a significant midden. Middens in the banks of Capembah Creek (Myora Springs) are significant as well.

The Quandamooka people mil binang (observe listen) to nature and the seasons. When the Mirriginpah (sea eagle) soar high in the sky over the sea, we watch and see if they dive for fish. When the melaleuca (paperbark tree) blooms in full, we know there will be an abundance of guja (honey). When the hairy caterpillars travel in long lines across the land, we know the ngundaril (mullet) will be moving up the coast.

We urge you too to observe and listen to mother nature. If you see wildlife such as dumbripi (koala), talobila and buangan (dolphin) or garuman (kangaroo), please respect that they are naturally wild.

As you visit this land and sea, we urge you to pay respects to Quandamooka Elders past and present. Acknowledge Naree Budjong Djara, Mother Earth. Enjoy Minjerribah bujarrang (beautiful Minjerribah) and Quandamookajara. We wish you all the best for your stay.

Please respect our culture and places, enjoy the experience and leave only footprints.

– EXPERIENCE OUR SPIRITUAL HOME –

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